Topic:Resource Name:Type:Local/State/NationalLink to Resource:
Racial Equity‘Troost Wall’ the product of Kansas City’s long-running racial plight: Racist real estate practices leave urban decayArticleLocalLink
Community Health Improvement2022-2027 Kansas City Community Health Improvement Plan (KC-CHIP)ReportLocalLink
Business Case for Health EquityA Business Case for Health EquityArticleNationalLink
Health Inequities: Pediatric Asthma/ HousingAn Interdisciplinary Health Disparities Research and Intervention Strategy Applied to the Problem of Pediatric Asthma in Kansas CityResearchLocalLink
Health Care in Colorado (Immigrant and Minority Health)Annual Report (2019-2020)ReportState (Colorado)Link
Racial EquityAs Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public HospitalArticleLocalLink
Provider BiasChallenging Providers To Look Within Themselves: A New Tool To Reduce Bias In Maternity CareArticleNationalLink
DemographicsCity Health DashboardSDOH Data OutcomesNational Link
Health Inequities (Including SDOH)County Health Rankings: ClayClinical and SDOH Data OutcomesLocalLink
Health Inequities (Including SDOH)County Health Rankings: JacksonClinical and SDOH Data OutcomesLocalLink
Health Inequities (Including SDOH)County Health Rankings: JohnsonClinical and SDOH Data OutcomesLocalLink
Health Inequities (Including SDOH)County Health Rankings: PlatteClinical and SDOH Data OutcomesLocalLink
Health Inequities (Including SDOH)County Health Rankings: WynadotteClinical and SDOH Data OutcomesLocalLink
COVID 19COVID Data TrackerData OutcomesNational Link
Business Case for Health EquityCreating the Business Case for Health EquityResearchNational Link
Health Inequities (Including SDOH)Eliminating disparities: Sickle CellResearchLocalLink
Racial EquityGovernors Commission on Racial Equity + JusticeReportStateLink
Social Determinants of HealthGovernors Commission on Racial Equity + JusticeReportStateLink
Racial EquityH.E.A.T : Wyandotte County Report ResearchLocalLink
Health Inequity (SDOH)Health department to tackle racism to improve health, living conditions in Kansas CityArticleLocalLink
Health Inequity and SDOHHealth EquityArticleNational Link
Patient ExperienceHis Story: " I would be better of Dead"ResearchNationalLink
Provider BiasHow Implicit Bias Contributes to Racial Disparities in Maternal Morbidity and Mortality in the United StatesResearchNationalLink
Racial EquityHow Kansas City’s Complex Racial History Is Still Influencing Education ChoicesArticleLocalLink
Provider BiasHow we fail black patients in painArticleNationalLink
Provider BiasImplicit bias in healthcare professionals: a systematic reviewResearchNationalLink
Racial EquityIn Focus: Reducing Racial Disparities in Health Care by Confronting RacismArticleNational Link
Health Inequities (Including SDOH)Kansas City, Missouri Community Health Improvement Plan (2016-2021)Clinical and SDOH Data OutcomesLocalLink
Health Inequities (Including SDOH)Kansas City, Missouri Health Department Interactive Community Health Assessment (CHA) DashboardClinical and SDOH Data OutcomesLocalLink
Health Inequities (Including SDOH)Kansas Health Matters City Dashboard and Disparities DashboardClinical and SDOH Data OutcomesLocalLink
Health Inequities (Including SDOH)Kansas Health Matters City Dashboard and Disparities DashboardClinical and SDOH Data OutcomesLocalLink
Social Determinants of Health; Mental Health DisparitiesKansas mental health crisis exacerbated by rising stress, worker pay disparityArticleStateLink
Racial EquityKansas racial equity panel calls attention to early childhood, maternal health disparitiesArticleStateLink
Social/Demographic Determinants of HealthLife Expectancy: Could where you live influence how long you live?Data OutcomesNational Link
Racial EquityLife expectancy: Your race should not determine your ability to live a long and healthy life.Demographic and SDOH Data TableNational Link
Health Care Facility RankingsLown Institute Hospitals IndexData Outcome on Health Care EquityNational Link
Health Inequities (Including SDOH)MARC Regional Health AssesementClinical and SDOH Data OutcomesLocalLink
Social Determinants of HealthMHA Health Equity DashboardsDemographic and SDOH Data TableStateLink
Health Inequities (Including SDOH)Missouri Public Health Infromation Management SystemClinical and SDOH Data OutcomesLocalLink
Racial EquityOpinion: The health-care industry doesn’t want to talk about this single wordArticleNational Link
Health Inequities (Including SDOH)Policy Link Kansas City Region Health Equity ReportResearchLocalLink
Provider BiasRace Disparities Persist in CGM Use Among Children with Type 1 DiabetesArticleNationalLink
COVID 19 and Racial InequityRacial Data DashboardClinical and SDOH Data OutcomesNational Link
Racial EquityRacial disparities in infant mortalities persist despite record low rates in KansasArticleStateLink
Racial EquityRacism at the Root of Kansas City Health Disparities, New Plan ConcludesArticleLocalLink
Health Inequity (SDOH)Report: KC metro region’s health improving but disparities persistArticleStateLink
Historical lessons structural racism in KCSeparate but Equal?ArticleLocalLink
Health Equity and Racial JusticeThe AMA’s strategic plan to embed racial justice and advance health equityArticleNational Link
Business Case for Health EquityThe Business Case for Racial EquityReportNationalLink
Health Inequities (Including SDOH)The Pandemic Imperiled Non-English Speakers In A HospitalArticleNational Link
Historical lessons structural racism in KCThe Public Health Connection Newsletter: Series on RacismArticle SeriesLocalLink
Education InequityUrban Education: Still Separate and UnequalReportLocalLink
Racial EquityWe need to clean the pond, not fix the fishArticleLocal
Racial EquityWhy do these Missourians have double the rate of asthma? New data shows health gapsArticleLocal
Health Equity and Marginalized GroupsWhy It Matters That Information On Race, Ethnicity, Gender, And Disability Are Measured Accurately And CompletelyArticleNational
TopicQuote/EvidenceResource Name:
Equity in Access to Contributors to HealthIn 2019, the highest life expectancy (86.3 years) in Kansas City, MO, belonged to zip code 64113 whose residents were 93% white. In contrast, the lowest life expectancy (68.1 years) belonged to zip code 64128 whose residents were 86% black. 2022-2027 Kansas City Community Health Improvement Plan (KC-CHIP)
Equity in Care and Treatment "However, few incentives exist for treating the uninsured or patients who are socially complex, or improving care for minority persons who may represent a relatively small percentage of a health care organization’s overall patient population and aggregate clinical performance scores."Creating the Business Case for Health Equity
Equity as a Strategic Priority Table 1. Recommended Actions for Governmental and Private Payors to Strengthen the Business Case for Health Equity/ https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11606-016-3604-7/tables/1Creating the Business Case for Health Equity
Equity in Care and Treatment "A foundational step is for CMS and private payors is to require health care organizations to report clinical performance data stratified by patient’s race, ethnicity, language, and socioeconomic status. Stratified performance data do not reduce disparities alone, but they do increase providers and administrators’ awareness of disparities in their own care and patients, and their motivation to implement solutions."Creating the Business Case for Health Equity
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health "Innovative intersectoral partnerships are greatly needed that encourage health care organizations and health plans to partner with community organizations and the public health, housing, education, and urban planning sectors to address social determinants of health and to keep people healthy."Creating the Business Case for Health Equity
Equity in Care and Treatment “Part of this is just getting much more clear-eyed about the fact that any of the elements of the Triple Aim that we assert we are committed to are fundamentally unachievable without addressing these realities."A Business Case for Health Equity
Equity in Access to Contributors to HealthAs of April 2021, eight out of the top ten Kansas City zip codes vaccinated against COVID-19 were between 73-95% white2022-2027 Kansas City Community Health Improvement Plan (KC-CHIP)
Equity in Care and Treatment In 1908, daily hospital spending on White patients was more than twice that of Black patients attending the same Kansas City facility. As Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public Hospital
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health/Equity in Care and Treatment In the early 20th Century, Black infant mortality rates were more than double that of White As Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public Hospital
Equity as a Strategic Priority In the mid-1920's, half of all accredited medical internships for Black physicians were offered in Kansas City or St. LouisAs Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public Hospital
Equity as a Strategic Priority In 1930, around 70% of Kansas City's Black physicians served as staff members for General Hospital No. 2As Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public Hospital
Equity as a Strategic Priority "By 1930, General Hospital No. 2 accounted for 95 percent of all professional and semiprofessional black employees of the municipal government of Kansas City, Missouri."As Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public Hospital
Equity as a Strategic Priority Construction delays of the new Hospital No. 2 were due to local White homeowners forcing the building site to relocate out of fear for a decrease in their property valueAs Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public Hospital
Equity in Care and Treatment White staff at General Hospital No. 1 consitently removed and never replaced medical equipment and supplies from No. 2 during the Pendergast yearsAs Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public Hospital
Equity in Care and Treatment After the fall of the Pendergast Democratic Machine, General Hospital No. 2 still suffered from chronic shortages of day-to-day supplies such as needles and syringes.As Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public Hospital
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Jackson is ranked in the lower middle range of counties in Missouri (Lower 25%-50%) for health outcomes.County Health Rankings: Jackson
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health 120 black children die per 100,000 lives, whereas 40 white children die per 100,000 lives. County Health Rankings: Wynadotte
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Wyandotte is ranked among the least healthy counties in Kansas (Lowest 0%-25%)County Health Rankings: Wynadotte
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health "In the U.S., the all-cause mortality rate is 16% greater for African Americans compared to white Americans."Health Equity
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health "Life expectancy differs based on income, with the richest 1% of men living an average of 14.6 years longer than the poorest."Health Equity
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health "In 2014, the life expectancy at birth was 75.6 years for blacks and 79.0 years for white, according to the CDC."Health Equity
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health "JC Nichols was referred mostly for protecting his neighborhoods, not from the tactics of criminals, but rather, preventing property values from depreciation, which included prohibiting the sale of homes to African Americans through restrictive covenants. Nichols began to file restrictions in such a way that they automatically renewed and required a notice to amend restrictions five years in advance of its renewal date, and that all homeowners had to agree to the change.The Public Health Connection Newsletter: Series on Racism : "What Lies Beneath"
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health "In the time after the Second World War, the Kansas City population began to shift as minority populations grew at a faster pace than the White population. The majority of this population lived in the area known as Southeast Kansas City, which was the target area of urban redevelopment projects and highway construction in the 1960s and 70s that displaced tens of thousands of residents."The Public Health Connection Newsletter: Series on Racism: "A segregated Kansas City is not good for our health"
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health "Research has shown that residential segregation, and wealth inequality are fundamentally linked to increases in health disparities, and continue to have lasting implications for the well-being of people of color and the overall health of a community. Segregation is a primary factor in racial differences in socioeconomic class, which in turn remains a fundamental cause of racial differences in health."The Public Health Connection Newsletter: Series on Racism: "A segregated Kansas City is not good for our health"
Equity in Care and Treatment "Pregnancy-related mortality ratios vary significantly by race, with White women experiencing 13.0 deaths per 100,000 births, compared with 42.8 deaths per 100,000 births for Black women, from 2011 to 2015."How Implicit Bias Contributes to Racial Disparities in Maternal Morbidity and Mortality in the United States
Equity in Care and Treatment  40% of first- and second-year medical students endorsed the belief that “black people’s skin is thicker than white people’s.” How we fail black patients in pain
Equity in Care and Treatment On Capitol Hill, Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) and Rep. Lauren Underwood (D-IL) introduced a broader version of a sweeping 2020 bill. The new version is known as the Black Maternal Health Momnibus Act of 2021. The 2021 package would study or fund issues related to maternal health disparities, prioritizing programs that require implicit bias training for health care workers and students.Challenging Providers To Look Within Themselves: A New Tool To Reduce Bias In Maternity Care
Equity as a Strategic Priority "Solving systemic racism in public health must start with naming it. We must publish the word. We must say the word. If health-care providers are to be competent in caring for communities that have been marginalized and oppressed for centuries, then they must understand the role racism plays in poor health. This includes chronic illness, delayed or denied care, barriers to access, condescension, assumptions, inadequate diagnoses and overt disregard."Opinion: The health-care industry doesn’t want to talk about this single word
Equity in Care and Treatment In the United States in 2005, heart disease mortality rate was 308.2 deaths per 100,000 people for Non-Hispanic Black individuals compared to 241.9 deaths per 100,000 people for Non-Hispanic White individualsIn Focus: Reducing Racial Disparities in Health Care by Confronting Racism
Equity in Care and Treatment In the United States in 2005, female breast cancer mortality rate was 35.5 deaths per 100,000 persons for Non-Hispanic Black individuals compared to 25.8 deaths per 100,000 persons for Non-Hispanic White individualsIn Focus: Reducing Racial Disparities in Health Care by Confronting Racism
Equity as a Strategic Priority White physicians served as "supervisors" to Black physicians within General Hospital No. 2As Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public Hospital
Equity as a Strategic Priority By 1920, a few dozen Black physicians held private practices in Kansas City As Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public Hospital
Equity as a Strategic Priority "By 1922, General Hospital No. 2 attained the highest Class A accreditation from the American Medical Association, the black National Medical Association, and the American College of Surgeons."As Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public Hospital
Equity in Care and Treatment In the United States in 2005, stroke mortality rate was 74.5 deaths per 100,000 persons for Non-Hispanic Black individuals compared to 52.3 deaths per 100,000 persons for Non-Hispanic White individualsIn Focus: Reducing Racial Disparities in Health Care by Confronting Racism
Equity in Care and Treatment "[From] 2009 [to] 2012, the incidence of breast cancer in black women was 124.3 cases per 100,000 women compared to 128.1 for white women."In Focus: Reducing Racial Disparities in Health Care by Confronting Racism
Equity in Care and Treatment "The five-year survival rate for breast cancer diagnosed in 2005-11 was 80% for black women and 91% for white women"In Focus: Reducing Racial Disparities in Health Care by Confronting Racism
Equity in Care and Treatment From 2005 to 2011, Black women were subject "to both later stage detection and poorer stage-specific survival [of breast cancer]."In Focus: Reducing Racial Disparities in Health Care by Confronting Racism
Equity in Care and Treatment "[In 2009,] 43% of patients of color who were candidates for [colorectal cancer] screening completed it [compared to] 69.2% of white patients."In Focus: Reducing Racial Disparities in Health Care by Confronting Racism
Equity in Care and Treatment In 2009, colorectal cancer screening rates among Latino individuals lagged White individuals by 5%In Focus: Reducing Racial Disparities in Health Care by Confronting Racism
Equity in Care and Treatment Black patients in the psychopathic ward of Hospital No. 2 were susceptible to dangerous, hot steam from exposed radiatorsAs Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public Hospital
Equity as a Strategic Priority The professional development of black doctors and nurses was limited by segregation and other restrictions imposed on Hospital No. 2As Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public Hospital
Equity as a Strategic Priority Black physicians and nurses at Hospital No. 2 who wanted to observe surgeries had to seek them out informally at Hospital No. 1As Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public Hospital
Equity as a Strategic Priority In 1957, amidst the Civil Rights Movement, the city council of Kansas City consolidated General Hospitals No.1 and No. 2 into the building of Hospital No. 1As Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public Hospital
Equity as a Strategic Priority While General Hospital No. 2 was "the best money could buy," it still could not overcome the effects of political corruption and racist policies against black doctors and patientsAs Good as Money Could Buy: Kansas City’s Black Public Hospital
Equity in Care and Treatment "Between 2009 and 2017, Kaiser [through the national Check.Change.Control campaign] increased the percentage of African Americans whose hypertension was controlled from 75.3% to 89.6%"In Focus: Reducing Racial Disparities in Health Care by Confronting Racism
Equity in Care and Treatment "Black mothers die from pregnancy-related complications at three to four times the rate of white [mothers]."In Focus: Reducing Racial Disparities in Health Care by Confronting Racism
Equity in Care and Treatment "A black woman is 22% more likely to die from heart disease than a white woman."In Focus: Reducing Racial Disparities in Health Care by Confronting Racism
Equity in Care and Treatment "[A black woman is] 71% more likely to perish from cervical cancer [than a white woman]."In Focus: Reducing Racial Disparities in Health Care by Confronting Racism
Equity in Care and Treatment "[A black woman is] 243% more likely to die from pregnancy- or childbirth-related causes [than a white woman."In Focus: Reducing Racial Disparities in Health Care by Confronting Racism
Equity in Access to Contributors to HealthIn 2019, 23.8% of Black students attending the third grade in Kansas City, MO, read at a proficient of advanced level compared to 34.7% for their Hispanic counterparts and 60% for their White counterpartsKansas City, Missouri Community Health Improvement Plan (2016-2021)
Equity in Access to Contributors to HealthIn 2019, 74.7% of Black K-12 students in Kansas City, MO, attended at least 90% of the school year compared to 78.5% and 87.5% for their White and Hispanic counterparts, respectively.Kansas City, Missouri Community Health Improvement Plan (2016-2021)
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health"Nearly half of all African American mothers in Kansas City do not receive prenatal care in the first trimester."Kansas City, Missouri Community Health Improvement Plan (2016-2021)
Equity in Access to Contributors to HealthIn 2018, 75.6% of White mothers living in Kansas City received prenatal care during their first trimester compared to 50.6% and 49.7% of their Black and Hispanic counterparts, respectivelyKansas City, Missouri Community Health Improvement Plan (2016-2021)
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health 61.82% of white people own their homes, while only 36.12% of Black people own their homes. Kansas City, Missouri Health Department Interactive Community Health Assessment (CHA) Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health/Equity in Care and Treatment Black babies die at 3.25 times the rate of white babies.Kansas City, Missouri Health Department Interactive Community Health Assessment (CHA) Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Life expectancy of Black/African American's is 71.6, whereas the life expectancy of white people is 79.1Kansas City, Missouri Health Department Interactive Community Health Assessment (CHA) Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Only 47.6% of the Hispanic/Latino population have health insurance compared to 86.6% of the white population having health insurance.Kansas Health Matters City Dashboard and Disparities Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health/Equity in Care and Treatment Black people are nearly two times as likely to die from an opiate involved overdose compared to white peopleKansas Health Matters City Dashboard and Disparities Dashboard
Equity in Care and Treatment Black people are more than 2 times as like as white people to die from prostate cancer.Kansas Health Matters City Dashboard and Disparities Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health According to the Lown Institute, the state of Kansas ranks 48th out of 51 (including D.C.) in average hospital social responsibility as of 2021Lown Institute Hospitals Index
Equity in Care and Treatment As of 2021, Providence Medical Center and University of Kansas Hospital are both "A-rated" and top hospitals in the state of Kansas according to the Lown Institute Lown Institute Hospitals Index
Equity in Care and Treatment As of 2021, Providence Medical Center is ranked second in health care inclusivity within the Kansas City region by the Lown InstituteLown Institute Hospitals Index
Equity in Care and Treatment White children with type 1 diabetes are twice as likely to initiate continuous glucose monitoring and four times as likely to persist with therapy at 1 year compared with Black and Hispanic children, regardless of insurance type.Race Disparities Persist in CGM Use Among Children with Type 1 Diabetes
Equity as a Strategic Priority "We estimate disparities in health in the U.S. today represent $93 billion in excess medical care costs and $42 billion in untapped productivity, for a total potential economic gain of $135 billion per year."The Business Case for Racial Equity
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health "Patients who didn't speak much, if any, English had a 35% greater chance of death."The Pandemic Imperiled Non-English Speakers In A Hospital
Equity as a Strategic Priority "Even reducing economic and racial segregation to the median national level would have a substantial positive financial impact. Black per-capita income would increase approximately 15.6% ($2,954), adding nearly $3 million in income."The Public Health Connection Newsletter: Series on Racism: "Is the American Dream Possible?"
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health 85% of Black fourth graders scored below proficient level in reading, compared to 58% of Whites .The Public Health Connection Newsletter: Series on Racism: "Is the American Dream Possible?"
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health "Kansas City Metropolitan Region was ranked as the fifth most economically segregated commuting zone in the United States."The Public Health Connection Newsletter: Series on Racism: "Is the American Dream Possible?"
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2018, Black individuals in Missouri were 91% more likely than White individuals to be stopped by law enforcementUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2018, the median net worth of Black households in Kansas City was only $17,600 compared to $171,000 for White householdsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2018, 24.67% of black households lived in poverty compared to only 7.97% of white householdsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health As of 2018, 90% of students enrolled in Kansas City Public School are BlackUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2018, the average ACT score for black students in Kansas City was 14.4 compared to 22.8 for white studentsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, median household income for Black families was $37,968 compared to $70,078 for White families in Kansas CityUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, median net worth of households for Black families was $17,600 compared to $171,000 for White families in Kansas CityUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, the poverty rate for Black people living in Kansas City was 200% higher than their White counterpartsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, only 56% of Black people living in Kansas City owned their home compared to 76.06% of White peopleUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Between 2015 and 2019, White home ownership rates in Kansas City increased 21.3% while Black home ownership rates increased by 4.8%Urban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, the age-adjusted death rate in Kansas City for Black people was 933 deaths per 100,000 people compared to 686 deaths per 100,000 people for their White counterpartsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, life expectancy at birth in Kansas City was 73.6 years for Black people compared to 78.39 years for White PeopleUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2018, the average life-expectancy for residents living in zip code region 64114 of Jackson County, MO, was 76.30 yearsLife Expectancy: Could where you live influence how long you live?
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2018, the average life-expectancy for residents living in zip code region 64133 of Jackson County, MO, was 82.30 yearsLife Expectancy: Could where you live influence how long you live?
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2018, the average life-expectancy for residents living in zip code region 64134 of Jackson County, MO, was 73.60 yearsLife Expectancy: Could where you live influence how long you live?
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2018, the average life-expectancy for residents living in zip code region 64138 of Jackson County, MO, was 76.50 yearsLife Expectancy: Could where you live influence how long you live?
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2018, the average life-expectancy for residents living in zip code region 66102 of Wyandotte County, KS, was 73.40 yearsLife Expectancy: Could where you live influence how long you live?
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2018, the average life-expectancy for residents living in zip code region 66104 of Wyandotte County, KS, was 77.90 yearsLife Expectancy: Could where you live influence how long you live?
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2018, the average life-expectancy for residents living in zip code region 66106 of Wyandotte County, KS, was 76.80 yearsLife Expectancy: Could where you live influence how long you live?
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2018, the average life-expectancy for residents living in zip code region 66109 of Wyandotte County, KS, was 77.50 yearsLife Expectancy: Could where you live influence how long you live?
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, 10.8% of people under age 65 and residing in zip code region 64114 of Jackson County, MO, were uninsured.City Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, 16.7% of people under age 65 and residing in zip code region 64133 of Jackson County, MO, were uninsuredCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, 15.6% of people under age 65 and residing in zip code region 64134 of Jackson County, MO, were uninsuredCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, 14.7% of people under age 65 and residing in zip code region 64138 of Jackson County, MO, were uninsuredCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, 30.08% of people under age 65 and residing in zip code region 66102 of Wyandotte County, KS, were uninsuredCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, 22.7% of people under age 65 and residing in zip code region 66104 of Wyandotte County, KS, were uninsuredCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, 19% of people under age 65 and residing in zip code region 66106 of Wyandotte County, KS, were uninsuredCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, 7.9% of people under age 65 and residing in zip code region 66109 of Wyandotte County, KS, were uninsuredCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health As of 11/2/21, 77.9% of residents 12 years of age and older living in Johnson County, KS, are fully vaccinatedCOVID Data Tracker
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health As of 11/2/21, 60.3% of residents 12 years of age and older living in Wyandotte County, Ks, are fully vaccinatedCOVID Data Tracker
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health As of 11/2/2021, 58.7% of residents 12 years of age and older living in Jackson County, MO, are fully vaccinatedCOVID Data Tracker
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health As of 11/2/2021, 54% of residents 12 years of age and older living in Cass County, MO, are fully vaccinatedCOVID Data Tracker
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health As of 11/2/2021, 56.5% of residents 12 years of age and older living in Clay County, MO, are fully vaccinatedCOVID Data Tracker
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health As of 11/2/2021, 58.8% of residents 12 years of age and older living in Platte County, MO, are fully vaccinatedCOVID Data Tracker
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Roughly 18.5% of the population residing in Wyandotte County, KS, are uninsuredCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Roughly 20.1% of the population residing in Wyandotte County, KS, are living in povertyCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Roughly 6% of the population residing in Johnson County, KS, are uninsuredCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Roughly 5.6% of the population residing in Johnson County, KS, are living in povertyCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Roughly 11.6% of the population residing in Jackson Couny, MO, are uninsuredCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Roughly 15.2% of the population residing in Jackson County, MO, are living in povertyCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Roughly 7.4% of the population residing in Cass County, MO, are uninsuredCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Roughly 9.8% of the population residing in Cass County, MO, are living in povertyCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Roughly 7.4% of the population residing in Clay County, MO, are uninusredCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Roughly 7.9% of the population residing in Clay County, MO, are living in povertyCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Roughly 6.2% of the population residing in Platte County, MO, are uninsuredCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health Roughly 6.9% of the population residing in Platte County, MO, are living in povertyCity Health Dashboard
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, fetal death rate in Kansas City was 6.47 deaths per 1,000 fetuses for Black people compared to 1.53 deaths per 1,000 fetuses for White peopleUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, the incidence of obesity for Black people living in Kansas City was roughly one-third higher than their White counterpartsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, twice as many white students from Kansas City obtained a Bachelor's degree compared to their black student counterpartsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health As of 2019, the average prison sentence for Black people from Kansas City was 7.7 years compared to 5.8 years for their white counterpartsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health As of 2019, 77% of murder victims in Kansas City were Black individuals while 20% were WhiteUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health As of 2019, Kansas City prisoners under the death sentence were five times more likely to be Black than WhiteUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health According to data from the 2016 Kansas Election, 72% of white Kansas residents were registered to vote compared to 61% of black Kansas residentsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, the median household income for Hispanic families living in Kansas City was $44,405 compared to $70,078 for non-Hispanic White familiesUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, the median net worth of Hispanic households in Kansas City was $12,329 compared to $171,000 for non-Hispanic White familiesUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, the poverty rate for Hispanic people living in Kansas City was 23.02% compared to 7.97% for their non-Hispanic White counterpartsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, 53.12% of Hispanic people owned their home in Kansas City compared to 76.06% of their non-Hispanic White counterpartsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health As of 2019, the age-adjusted death rate for Hispanic individuals living in Kansas City was 465 deaths per 100,000 people compared to 686 deaths per 100,000 people for non-Hispanic White individualsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health As of 2019, the life expectancy at birth for Hispanic individuals living in Kansas City was 82.07 years compared to 78.39 years for their non-Hispanic White counterpartsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health As of 2019, the fetal death rate for Hispanic individuals living in Kansas City was 4.6 deaths per 1,000 fetuses compared to 3.6 deaths per 1,000 fetuses for non-Hispanic White individualsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, the incidence of HIV/AIDS among Hispanic individuals living in Kansas City was significant higher than that of their non-Hispanic White counterpartsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, the incidence of being slightly overweight (BMI of 25-29.9) was roughly 8% lower in Hispanic individuals living in Kansas City compared to their non-Hispanic White counterpartsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to HealthIn 2019, 15% of third grade students attending school in zip code region 64110 of Kansas City, MO, were reading at a proficient or advanced level compared to 85.4% of third grade students in zip code region 64155. Kansas City, MO, Community Health Improvement Plan 2016-2021
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health In 2019, the incidence of obesity was higher among Hispanic children living in Kansas City compared to non-Hispanic White childrenUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health As of 2019, the average ACT composite score for Hispanic students living in Kansas City was 14.8 compared to 22.8 for non-Hispanic White studentsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity in Access to Contributors to Health As of 2019, 16% of Hispanic individuals 25 years of age and older and living in Kansas City possessed a Bachelor's Degree compared to 42% for their non-Hispanic White counterpartsUrban Education: Still Separate and Unequal
Equity as a Strategic Priority Among active physicians, 56.2% identified as White, 17.1% identified as Asian, 5.8% identified as Hispanic, and 5.0% identified as Black or African American. Note that the race for 13.7% of active physicians is Unknown, making that the largest subgroup after White and AsianAmerican Association of Medical Colleges Diversity in Medicine Facts and Figures 2019
Equity as a Strategic Priority The percentage of full-time U.S. medical school faculty by race/ethnicity in 2018: White (63.9%) and Asian (19.2%). Only 3.6% of full-time faculty in 2018 were Black or African American, and 5.5% were Hispanic, Latino, or of Spanish Origin (alone or in combination with another race/ethnicity).American Association of Medical Colleges Diversity in Medicine Facts and Figures 2019
Equity as a Strategic Priority The Leverage Network, an organization that promotes Black leadership, worked with University of Michigan to conduct a study of Boards of Directors across 41 of the largest organizations in the nation, including providers, payers, pharmaceutical and biotech companies found on average healthcare boards comprised 87% white members and 13% people of color. Nearly three-fourths (72%) of the members were male, and only 3% were Black women. A previous study by the American Hospital Association found 14% of Board seats were held by people of color, leading to a call for action but the later study no progress appeared to have been made. The Leverage Network: Inequity Starts at the Top